Category Archives: Street Art

The REDEFINE Magazine Arts Blog Has Moved!

Hi! Just wanted to write to let you know that our blog is now being hosted directly on our website, at:

http://www.redefinemag.com/arts/

Please update your links and blog readers. We will also be starting to update on a more frequent basis, hopefully daily, so if you have art news, show openings, or work you would like to pass onto us, please write us at letters@redefinemag.com ~

Thank you! 🙂

Cheap Thrills at Snowboard Connection!

Puddletown in Portland’s Compound Gallery

Living in the Pacific Northwest, one becomes used to rain and gloom, and after a while, it’s just a part of life and seasonal disorders seem nonexistent. Puddletown at Compound Gallery will feature artists’ takes on rain from Thursday, December 4th, 2008 (First Thursday) through December 24th, 2008. Here are some notable artists from this opening:


Robert Fayze Pellicer seems to combine equal parts surrealism, nature, and spirituality in his works, such as in this piece, entitled Food Web.


Timothy Karpinski must be the type who pays attention to details. Graphic, acrylic, and hand-sewn papers join forces in the elegant I Dream of the Forest.


Colors bleed, swirl, and transform to join forces with unpredictable shapes in Max Kauffman‘s The Block Is Hot.


Elliott Wall makes the simple female form intoxicatingly haunting and fascinating with ease, such as in this piece, Moth.


In the case of Eli Effenberger and this piece, Over The Rainbow, digital paints are just as good as the real thing.


Eatcho seems to prefer painting and drawing on recycled papers and wood panels, and for good reason. His illustrations and exceptional compositions exclusively hold their own, with no need for detailed backgrounds.

Sophie Franz, shown in the post below, will also be showing her illustrations and drawings at this group show.

Myong Kurily Brings The World To Chicago

Myong Kurily has a whole lot of the world inside her, and it translates into her art. She’s an equal-opportunity artist who loves to paint on sheets of acrylic as much as she likes to paint on canvases. She likes incorporating Eastern-influenced animals as much as she likes using Victorian-styled female characters. Kurily might have gotten a name out for herself through crafting clothing and kicks for Grammy award-winning rapper Lupe Fiasco, but at her upcoming solo show, Utopist, she will prove that she is just as much a standalone artist as anyone. Utopist will also showcase Kurily’s first large-scale art installation, and judging by her other works, it should be worth checking out.

View the flyer below for more details about the show at Phaiz!

Free Sheep Foundation Has October On Lockdown

We wrote about the Free Sheep Foundation months ago, but their music and art combining antics just keep getting more frequent, more relevant, and more unpredictable.

Here’s what their upcoming October calendar looks like… just to give you a wee little taste of what is to come (not to mention the October 1 and 2 events that have already passed).

OCT 3 – GUTTER DANDY GALA, 9PM – 2AM, $5-$10 SUGGESTED
(Girl punk bands and window installations!)
MUSIC: Orkestar Zirconium, Hot Grits!, Scratchmaster Joe, motrecraft
ART INSTALLATIONS: Garek Druss, Static Invasion, scntfc, NKO, No Touching Ground, dk pan, Karn Junkinsmith, Wen Marcoux

OCT 10 – GALLERY OPENING, FT. FORT
(Video projections, new window installations, and a blanket/chair/sofa fort!!!)
ART INSTALLATIONS: Gretchen Bennet, Laura Corsiglia, Sirkullay, Mark Johnson
VIDEO: Mike Min

OCT 10 & 11 – SILVERING PATH
(3 dance/visual/art collabos, featuring… way too much stuff…)
MUSIC: Jeffrey Huston, Joshua Kohl
DANCE: Haruko Nishimura (Degenerate Art Ensemble)
ART/SCULPTURE: Mandy Greer, Colin Ernst
FILM: Ian Lucero
DRESS: Anna Lange


Just one amazing crochet sculpture piece by Mandy Greer!

* BRAIN EXPLOSION *
Be there or be square. These are some exciting times in the Seattle arts scenes.

Cultura De Base Street Art Protest in Barcelona

A week and a half ago, I was in Barcelona and stumbled a protest that seemed well-organized and was immediately engaging. With my limited Spanish, I managed to pick up slogans like, “Beauty is not for sale,” and “Barcelona is dead.” It became immediately obvious that the protest was politically and artfully-motivated.

From an outside perspective, those statements seem extreme, especially considering Barcelona is known for its street art. Street art radiates practically from every corner of the city, and I’m not just talking meaningless little tags here and there. Barcelona is a storehouse of graffiti and street art pieces that actually look as though they took time, passion, commitment, and energy.

What then, caused this outpouring of anger from the art community of Barcelona?

Not many people in Spain speak English that well, so after an hour of standing around wondering, I finally decided to try my luck and ask around. In Spanish, I was told something along the lines of this. The protest stemmed from police actions that resulted in the closing of art spaces in a nearby neighborhood. The closed spaces were important hubs for musicians and artists alike, and as a result, the artistic community felt patronized and felt that bureaucratic decisions involving their livelihoods were being made without their input.

People of all ages participated in the peaceful protest, which was artistic in and of itself. A giant banner was unfurled on which visitors were allowed to scrawl their opinions. A booth tacked with, “Take off your pants!” encouraged visitors to defy the norm and take Polaroids of themselves naked.

It is only in a city like Barcelona with such a lively street art scene that such a demonstration can happen. While I cannot fully grasp the ramifications of all this bureaucracy on the Barcelona art community, I sincerely hope that it emerges from this better than before.

If you can read Spanish, head on over to culturadebase.net to find out more information about this movement. If you know more information about Cultura De Base, please share your knowledge. Thanks!

Artifakt’s Two Year Anniversary!

It seems like just yesterday that the Seattle urban art non-profit Artifakt was started. Run by dozens of volunteers, Artifakt brings in fresh artists and live music to nearly all of their events and have really made quite a name for themselves in the last two years.

Tomorrow is their celebration at Lo Fi for their two year anniversary. Be there or be square!

Amongst the headlining artists on display is Chris Sheridan, who has some new skateboards on display in the photos below. Which is your favorite?