Category Archives: Digital

The REDEFINE Magazine Arts Blog Has Moved!

Hi! Just wanted to write to let you know that our blog is now being hosted directly on our website, at:

http://www.redefinemag.com/arts/

Please update your links and blog readers. We will also be starting to update on a more frequent basis, hopefully daily, so if you have art news, show openings, or work you would like to pass onto us, please write us at letters@redefinemag.com ~

Thank you! 🙂

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Puddletown in Portland’s Compound Gallery

Living in the Pacific Northwest, one becomes used to rain and gloom, and after a while, it’s just a part of life and seasonal disorders seem nonexistent. Puddletown at Compound Gallery will feature artists’ takes on rain from Thursday, December 4th, 2008 (First Thursday) through December 24th, 2008. Here are some notable artists from this opening:


Robert Fayze Pellicer seems to combine equal parts surrealism, nature, and spirituality in his works, such as in this piece, entitled Food Web.


Timothy Karpinski must be the type who pays attention to details. Graphic, acrylic, and hand-sewn papers join forces in the elegant I Dream of the Forest.


Colors bleed, swirl, and transform to join forces with unpredictable shapes in Max Kauffman‘s The Block Is Hot.


Elliott Wall makes the simple female form intoxicatingly haunting and fascinating with ease, such as in this piece, Moth.


In the case of Eli Effenberger and this piece, Over The Rainbow, digital paints are just as good as the real thing.


Eatcho seems to prefer painting and drawing on recycled papers and wood panels, and for good reason. His illustrations and exceptional compositions exclusively hold their own, with no need for detailed backgrounds.

Sophie Franz, shown in the post below, will also be showing her illustrations and drawings at this group show.

Of Montreal Blik Surface Graphics? What’s Next?

Of Montreal is a band that has seen success as the result of good music (arguable), but also good marketing (possibly also arguable, but not as much).

First, their music video for “Wraith Pinned To The Mist And Other Games,” featuring cutsy-wootsy pop art animation, garnered wide attention from the web nerds. Then, the same song was used, slightly altered, for a obnoxious yet hypnotic Outback Steakhouse commercial.

And now comes of Montreal’s wonderful new shenanigan for their new album, Skeletal Lamping… Blik Surface Graphics inspired by the album artwork!!

A true of Montreal fan benefits hugely from this offer, as purchasing one $40 set also gives a code to download the whole album digitally. So, after doing the math, if each song is purchased at $0.99 apiece digitally and there are 15 songs, the graphics pretty much only cost $25. Which is not bad at all, especially when one considers that these are these are extremely intricate packages with many pieces.

The David Barnes package (click here to view) has 105 movable and reusable pieces, and the Gemini Tactics package (click here to view has 55 movable and reusable pieces.

Compare that to something like this Lacy Sunday package by Jan Habraken, which only comes with 4 colors in three packages, and you REALLY get an idea of what a good deal this is. If you’re an of Montreal fan.

Or maybe you just like their graphics and want to sell the code for the album download.

Maquinas & Almas, Digital Arts and New Mediums at the Reina Sofia

Contemporary art really gets a bad rap sometimes. A canvas painted solid blue or an collage of abstract shapes might catch the eye of some, but it simply can’t be understood by everyone. Maquinas & Almas, Arte Digital Y Nuevos Medios (Machines & Souls, Digital Art and New Mediums) is a new temporary art exhibition at Madrid’s Museum of Contemporary Art, the Reina Sofia. This exhibition probably features contemporary art that is as universally-accepted as contemporary art will ever get.

Right now, simple electronic objects garner the attention of practically all human beings on the planet. Maquinas & Almas combines technology and art in an amazing, creative, and participatory way that engages even the largest of contemporary art skeptics.

Unfortunately, half of the exhibition closed on September 15th. Luckily, the remaining part of the exhibition was strong enough to stand alone on its own.

For starters are some relatively well-known pieces by Sachiko Kodama, which utilize toxic magnetic fluids and electrical pulses to create moving black structures.


Sachiko Kodama

One installation that held my attention for about an hour was Ben Rubin and Mark Hansen‘s Listening Post installation. The two hung small LCDs in a 11 tall and 21 wide rectangular shape, and filled the LCDs with various text tidbits datamined (remember in The Dark Knight?) from thousands of online chatroom conversations. Sequenced and timed alongside sound effects and digitalized voices, the installation was broken up into various arrangements of audio and visual harmony.

Once the arrangements had cycled through their program, the viewer would then find that even though the upcoming texts repeated the same patterns, they didn’t necessarily have the same datamined words. Only a person who stayed at the installation for hours would legitimately know how many iterations it really has.

But words cannot adequately describe an installation such as this one, so why don’t we try using a video?

While there are other pieces in the exhibit that were notable, Daniel Rozin‘s Trash Mirror stood out the most. The piece is assembled like a mosaic, with individual pieces of recycled trash placed side by side to create a nice neat rectangle. An overhead light illuminates all of the pieces, and when no objects are nearby, all of the trash is clearly visible. When someone stands in front of the trash mirror, however, motion sensors then reflect the “mirrored” pieces downwards, removing them from the direct overhead light. The result is a pulsing, twitching shadow that mirrors the form and actions of the individual standing before it.

Again, enough talking about the piece, though… go to http://www.smoothware.com/danny/newtrashmirror.html to see the Trash Mirror in all its moving glory!!

Illustrator Alberto Cerriteno and His Digital and Analog Prowess

Fine artists sometimes dabble in digital art, and digital artists sometimes dabble in fine art. Unfortunately for those crossover artists, however, most of them are either only good on one or the other. It’s quite difficult to excel in both the paintbrush and the mouse, it seems.

Good thing illustrator Alberto Cerriteno is adept at both. Residing in Portland, Cerriteno combines the best of street art with rich textures lifted from aspects of his Mexican heritage. As a result, his pieces are equally commercial as they are not; they are cute and chock full of personality, yet feel perfectly at home gracing the cover of a magazine.

His painted pieces are whispy and emotional, while his digital pieces are sweetly assembled to the point of looking as though they were collaged with pieces from dozens of publications. Still others are a combination of both analog and digital, and they draw strengths from both.

But enough yapping. Look on for some samples of his work, and visit his website to see more.

alberto cerriteno
Ink and watercolor come together with digital treatment in The Cloud, The Boy, The Stars & The Umbrella.

alberto cerriteno
A totally digital piece, Fishing With Love!